TG
myTG

SHARE

Repaying Your Student Loan

 

Unemployment Deferment


"I am unemployed or working less than 30 hours a week, or working full time at a job that is not expected to last more than 90 consecutive days."

The Unemployment Deferment is a deferment for borrowers who wish to postpone payment of their student loan(s) while unemployed or working less than 30 hours a week, or while working full time at a job that is not expected to last more than 90 consecutive days.

If your first loan was made before July 1, 1993, the maximum cumulative time frame that you may receive this deferment is 24 months. If your first loan was made on or after July 1, 1993, the maximum cumulative time frame that you may receive this deferment is 36 months.


Qualifications

You may qualify, if:

  • You are diligently attempting but unable to find full-time employment in the United States in any field, at any salary, or at any responsibility level, and you are registered with a private or public employment agency if there is one within 50 miles of your permanent or temporary address (school placement offices and "temporary" agencies do not qualify as public or private employment agencies); or
  • You provide documentation establishing that you are eligible for unemployment benefits.
  • If you are requesting an extension of an existing unemployment deferment, you must have made at least six diligent attempts to find full-time employment in the most recent six months.

How to Apply

  1. Download the Unemployment Deferment Request in English or Spanish.
  2. Carefully read the entire form. Certain documentation may be required.
  3. Complete, print, and sign the deferment form. (To enter information into the interactive form, place your cursor in a field or tab from field to field. Turn interactive check boxes on and off by clicking on the box.) Mail it directly to your loan holder. Only your loan holder can approve your deferment request.
  4. If you need further assistance, please contact your lender or servicer or TG Default Prevention.

Back to Top